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to mayor bloomberg, who said that the damage was unprecedented, that maybe the worst damage the city has ever faced, and the tidal surge, which was 14 feet -- governor christie said that the damage to new jersey was unthinkable. we had massive flooding. if you look at the snow and the shutdown of the stock exchange and flooding in the subway, you get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. yet the networks performed. i have read dozens of stories in the last couple weeks about how for many consumers, their only link to information or to people was through their smartphones. while there was an impact on cell sites, the networks performed very well. >> 25% of sell power coverage went down. are they hurricane-proof? >> 25% of cell towers were impacted, not service. some towers are capacity based to add extra capacity in high- tech -- high traffic areas. a lot of them are to provide basic service. when you say 25% were impacted, that does not mean service was down by that. some were impacted. our towers rely on power. i think we found out and sandy that some of it was a there w
. my college -- public institution that serves the inner-city section of york -- did away with rotc about 16 years after i graduated because of the vietnam war. they have decided to bring it back this year. [applause] >> i want to leave you with one story and one thought. i was in minnesota. they have the military appreciation fund. they collect money for rehab, college, and other things. it unifies the entire state. the speaker was a mother of a national guardsman who had gone three times to iraq. she is a big executive at the target corporation. she did not want to be involved with her son's activities. she went off to see him often. she was named the chair of the parents left behind. look at the young mothers with their children who were crying because her daddy had gotten on the airplane. she thought she owed it to her son and her country into the sun people. she gave me the most haunting line i have never heard -- i quickly learned when you are a military mother, you go home and draw the lines on the window that looked out across the driveway. you cannot bear the idea of the mi
, december 3, and that will focus on high speed and inner city passenger rail grant program. and then we'll have the final hearing on this important subject. thursday, the 13th of december, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee overseas -- oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of a
of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, the advances have been largely reverse through a renewed and even more effective partnership. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling aqap, eliminating it as a threat will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. assistance, a close partnership with the yemeni government, yet many people, and steadfast support. another country we have made progress in recently is somalia. for years i became director of the cia. it was obvious somalia was a failed state, a failed state where the militant group al- shabaab controlled large pieces of territory, declared fealty to out-, brought about by humanitarian crisis and planned to -- declared fealty to al qaeda, and brought about humanitarian crisis. now there, too, we have seen progress in large part because of the african union mission in somalia. the result is al-shabaab that has lost more than 50% of the territory it held in 2010. since losing control of mogadishu in august of 2011, hundreds of al-shabaab fighters have surrendered to forces. these forces recently too
, the new york city police commissioner nominated by president bush to be part of his department of all land -- homeland security. they didn't vett him carefully because later he pleaded tuilty to -- guilty to fraud. or the designation as secretary of labor that had to be withdrawn the next week because a woman gave her some money and it may or may not have been illegal. but she had misled the vetters, and they threw her under the bus. after the governor romney campaign, there may be a new set of questions. it is a difficult thing if you are nominated to a prestigious post as an officer of the united states. the most important part happens in the senate. for instance, bill clinton wanted to support -- appoint robert reich. robert founded intimidating to be at hearings in front of the senate. he wrote a book called lost in the cabinet. these are sometimes known as murder boards. you can see why it is called that. he is explaining in his book, the preparation and his aides helping him get to the nomination process and practicing with him. i am planning for a confirmation hearing, i feel like a
the city has faced. the storm surge was 14 feet. governor christie said the damage to new jersey was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane force winds, massive flooding, snow -- look back at the flooding to the subway systems, the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you get the sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. i have read dozens of stories about how for many consumers their only link to information or to people was through their smartphone, social media and their smartphone. it obviously had an impact -- i think the networks performed really well. >> my assessment here is some networks did well, some networks did less well. but we really do not have solid information because there are no reporting requirements on these networks, no standards by which to measure their performance, and it is entirely voluntary whether they want to talk to the fcc or state and local governments or not. i think they responded well -- i also heard some of them did less well. the first step is we have to find out who did well and who did not do well and how we make sure everybody does we
among the teaching profession. we need to do more to encourage young people and people in inner cities to go into teaching. teach for america is not a long- term solution. it is free people from the outside into inner-city. we need to get people in the inner cities to go into teaching and serve their own communities. we need to do a lot more training around cult throw competency -- cultural compotencies around teachers. there was a criticism of the demographics of the teachers and the student body. >> the teach for america thing is so transient. the minority population of students are going at higher numbers. it was a 35% at to thousands -- it was a 35% in 2000. now is that 50 -- it is at 45%. half a are only educating for two years and they are out. they do not look like a black educators. they do not look like a latino educator. >> to their credit, teach for america is trying to get ideas on how they can do more to diversify their core. even within the current system, we need a new teacher core. what concerns me is the lack of cultural competency, the lack of linguistic competency wh
the facility of the united states postal service located at 320 7th street in ellwood city, pennsylvania, as the sergeant leslie h. sabo jr. post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. gosar, and the gentleman from missouri, mr. clay, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. gosar: mr. speaker, h.r. 5954, introduced by the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 320 7th street in ellwood city, pennsylvania, as the sergeant leslie h. sabo jr. post office building. the bill is co-sponsored by the entire pennsylvania state delegation and was favorably reported by the committee on oversight and government reform on s
basically said if you are a small county in alabama or a city and you want to exchange your election laws or voting laws, you have to basically get it cleared ahead of time in washington and send some sort of form to the justice department to explain what you are going to do or you could go to a federal court. the theory was for 100 years, even though racial discrimination had been outlawed by the 15th amendment, a lot of cities and towns that control the voter rolls had various schemes that prevented blacks from registering to vote, so the federal government -- this is an unusual lot to say we are going to put the whole part of the country under special scrutiny of the federal courts -- that law still exists. the dissected by the voting rights act. it still is the case, if texas wants to change its congressional districts or have a new voter id laws. the networks -- a need to get it cleared from washington. host: how many states are we talking? guest: there are nine states, i think, covered by the law. the formula, i can tell you the simple part of it. it is the deep south. from there it
city. and there was a wonderful moment the night before the community opened when one of his lutenants was sitting around a table in arizona and he said how am i going to sell a 30 year mortgage to somebody who is 65-year-old. and they said we should have thought about that before. and they had sleepless nights and the next day 100,000 people came. and they managed to make what was seen as a necessity, a virtue. and this idea of the golden years became a hall mark of the american dream. it's not just retirement that was invented in the last century. even addlessens t idea of youth was concocted in the early part of the century. that word was coined by a 60-year-old. because we were at a situation in the country where there was a proliferation of the night nors of that day. i was talking earlier about night young nor old as the characteristic of so many of news our 50's, 60's, sevent. well there were these young people who weren't children or quite adults. there was a lot of disruption in the country. there was concern about these young people who had physician cal maturity but not emot
their buddies, but it didn't start there. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they ought to enter the service. sometimes it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes they lost a loved one. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community and people made a big deal about them leaving. sometimes they do it over some of the protests and concerns of friends or family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out for them. they decided that they just needed to serve and they do that. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. no matter what the recruiter tell you, it is never like that. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor, airman, marine. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is no longer part of individual. it is all being part of t
, the disparity. i was a bus driver and had an opportunity to see what went on in the affluent areas in the city of chicago. because it's based on real estate taxes, the funding, never being able to have the same opportunities. those kids have laptops and can take them home. but there's not even a computer in the class rooms within the city of chicago. my sister is a principal in the system. i asked her one question that would be critical to making the situation better for the students, she said to bring back the resources to the school in order to help the parents in dysfunctional houses that are underserved with 20% unemployment and we would get a more conducive environment and for the children to learn so they could be more prepared for school and retain what they learn in school. 14,: here's the september 2012 article puts out by the white house -about the effects of the potential cuts that will go into place on december 31 if no deal is struck over the fiscal cliff. the automatic spending cuts, defense and non-defense. in the report, educational achievement and special- education programs w
think something everyone can focus on is there are schools in inner-city areas that because of academy sponsors are doing better than schools than suburbs soca
on is there are schools in inner-city areas that because of academy sponsors are doing better than schools than suburbs so we can use this change to drive up aspiration and achievement right ac
. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they should enter the service. sometime it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community. sometimes they do it over and some of the protest and concerns of friends and family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. it is never like with the recruiter tells you. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is all being part of the team. the team is one important than the individual. from the beginning of basic training and advanced training and when they are sent to their first unit, they are always in groups. they are part of that. they are assigned to a permanent force
at games with poverty and games of money. one of my favorite examples was a group out of new york city called the area code. if you are looking at lots of examples of creative solutions to problems, is one to look at. they did a game around money where communities in the south that have high rates of mortgage defaults, and low rates of savings, and they made up a currency called macon money. macon, georgia, so they had macon money. ads in dollar bills but all of them have been cut in half. they gave out all this money, but they were all half a dollar bill. the currency could be used in local stores in services like cash, but you had to find the other person with half of your bill, and they created a social gaming environment where you could meet up. if we met in a coffee shop we could use its air, and it created a social layer and physical community to transform the community and also bring positive of motions, that you have solved this problem and have success, and it is really interesting. basically, my answer is yes. there are so many crazy things you can thing to do with a game des
was an president and maybe the worst storm the city ever faced and the tidal surge was 14. governor chris christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable and we had fires and hurricane force winds, massive flooding, deepersnow. when you looked at that and but flooding to the health care systems and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start to get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm and yet the networks performed. i have read dozens of stories over the last couple weeks on how for many consumers their only tie to any information or people was through their smartphone, linking social media and other smartphone. while there was an impact on some websites, the networks performed really pretty well. >> my assessment is some networks did well, some networks did less well, but we don't have solid information about this, because there are no reporting requirements on these networks, no standards by which we measure their performance is. it is entirely voluntary whether they want to talk to the fcc or to their state or local governments. i take their word for it that they respo
of this week to head down to mexico city to the president of mexico's inaugural -- inauguration, and i agree with my colleague that our relationship with mexico is vitally important and the idea the best units have provided an invaluable support on the border in terms of cash and weapons going -- confiscating cash and weapons going into mexico. i can't think of beater program to name after jamie zapata. i will also say on the sembling occasions that i met with agent avalon and his family, it's been very emotional. to see someone who's come back almost from an operation of war, if you will, who's been shot at at the cartel members, almost going through a ptsd-type situation, a very, very emotional experience. and i wish agent avila and his family the very best in their recovery. very, very brave man and soldier. and also to the family of jamie zapata. we honor you today with this bill and know that you are always in our thoughts and in our prayers. and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the q
the museum for doing this. i have got a friend hear some more. he was the founder of circuit city and he has just written a book called the rise and fall of circuit city. to some degree, they are uncomfortable truth is when you think about nations, companies. of there certainly rise and fall stories. political campaigns are really lousy times to think about the hard truth of what is happening. one of the hard truth about our panel is that we are five white guys. we try to figure out how to divvy this up. we're four tall guys and dog. we are very aware of this. for all of you to e-mail the in, we know. what i wanted to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back t
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it also had a wrong the number address. the street only goes to 250 and it went to 261. host: what is the process there? caller: i have no idea. i called city hall. they had no name of that voter. i tell the voters he was not allowed to vote of my polling system. he then threatened me and said he would come after me. he had people waiting outside of the before me. it was a very frightening situation. fortunately, a voter who was there with me came to my defense. i called city hall and they said, we would never issue anything like that. there was an official stamp. i also called the district attorney's office. they never called me back. i called and called again. this is our right fraud. if you just had a voter i.d.. the lines are enormous. i have to check the spelling of their name, i have to look up everything. it is so much easier and nicer for us as a worker. i was there for 14 hours that day with a half hour lunch
last year, aqap attempted to seize the initiative, taking control of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, aqap's advances have been largely reversed through a renewed and each more effective partnership with yemen's new government led by president hadi. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling aqap, eliminating it as a threat to the united states, will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. training and assistance, close partnership with the yemeni government and yemeni people and steadfast support for political transition. another country we have made good progress in recently is somalia. for years when i became director of the c.i.a., it was thoobs that somalia was a failed state where al-shabab controlled large pieces of territory, declared fealty to al qaeda, brought about a humanitarian crisis and planned attacks in the region but there, too, we have seen significant progress. in large part because of an effective partnership between the united states and the african union mission in somalia. the result is an al-shabab that lost 50% of
-oriented city encircled by soviet-leaning east germany. and so president kennedy was afraid throughout the cuban missile crisis that if they just invaded, that would be over in a certain amount of time. but then the soviets could very easily dot same to berlin. they could just take over berlin without much difficulty. and that would lead, if the west chose, which it probably would have, to a nuclear exchange. so the sequence of likely events in president kennedy's thinking was if cuba fell easily, which we now know it would not have, then the soviets would have taken berlin, which would have led to a conflagration in europe and really the end of the world. >> i want to go back. right around this time there was the civil rights issue at the university of mississippi, and we've got a couple of tapes, one from september 30 of 162 and one from september 22. the first one obviously 292nd with ross barnett. who is he? >> he's governor the mississippi. he's in a tight spot because he's fanned the flames of segregation, thinking he's an ardent segregationist. his political base was based on that. but th
destabilized last year, aq ap took control of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, their advances have been largely reversed through a renewed and even more effective partnership with yemen's new government. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling them, eliminating it as a threat to the united states will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. training and assistance, close partnership with the government and people of yemen and political support for transition. another country we have made good progress is somalia. for years -- when i became director of the c.i.a., it was obvious that somalia was a failed state. the failed state where the militant group controlled large pieces of territory. declared allegiance to al qaeda and brought about a humanitarian crisis and planned attacks in the region. but there, too, we have seen significant progress. in large part because of an effective partnership between the united states and the african union mission in somalia. the result of these efforts is an al shabaab that has lost 50% of the territory it hel
other cities, we have a long way to go. these innovative and creative programs, when you give these parents options to help meet these kids where they are, it allows us to fly the plane while we fix it. people want to put us in these boxes. if you support traditional public schools, or you are against traditional public schools. are you a democrat, in your going to support some of the status quo, or you going to be a progressive and support innovation creativity. i do not think it is a zero sum game. when it comes to educating a child, there is no republican or democratic way to educate a child. there is no black or white way to educate a child. there is no rich or poor way to educate a child. when it comes down to learning how to read and write and count, there is two things are important. you have a student who is there who wants to learn, and you have a teacher who is quality based who has a passion for educating these kids. i have seen over the past few years where we is falling short is we are so stock on the way we used to do things. the economic argument, the analysis o
cities like new york with a big apartment houses and complexes, it would be hard to get, especially for older residents, to go down to the street and pick up the mail. pharmaceutical drugs being delivered to their first floor offices. so, they are looking at various things, various ways they can cut around the edges. of course, the biggest change of all the of looking at would be the closure of some post offices. they are trying to come up with some -- there are some 3000 facilities all across the country, maybe cut back by 10%. how they choose which ones to pick is they would have something like what they use for closing military bases, base realignment closure commission, a brac-like commission to pick which facilities to be closed. that is a controversial item, being proposed by the house. host: cindy on twitter send this -- the price of forever stamps are rising in january again. guest:, i believe it is going up to 46 cents from 45. yes, it is going up. one of the things they're talking about is should the postal authorities, the postal regulatory commission, should they be allo
the office open and when something really big happens in kabul, in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you should then one of the star correspondents or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are >> i do not want to go too far. i want to talk to a little bit about the role of cable television, for which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you said making -- derided ideological coverage of the news bad for america, you said, making it difficult, if not impossible, for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote in an op-ed piece, this is not good for the rubble. what do you mean? >> this goes back. it is a continuation of the same thing. first of all, in addition to demonstrating that network news divisions could make money, there was a technological explosion. it wasn't just the three networks anymore. you have cable, satellite tele
the city ever faced, governor christy said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable, we had fires and hurricane force winds and massive flooding and feet of snow. if you look at that and look at the flooding to the subway systems and the shut down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the mass of scale and sense of scope of this storm yet networks performed. for many consumers their only link to information was through their smart phone, linking social media and their smart phone. while there was an impact on cell sites i think the networks performed well. >> my asays sment some networks did well, some did less well. there are no reporting requirements on these networks, there are no standards by which we measure their performance and it's voluntary whether they want to talk to their state and local governments or not. so i take their word for it that they responded well. i also have anecdotely heard that some of these guys did less well and i think the first step is find out who did well and who didn't well and how we make sure everybody does well. >> the impact of hurricane
with city they want this. they want that. they constantly what more documentation. they tell me they are doing more pureed then they call me up and tell me i do not qualify because of this reason for that reason. what can i do to modify my mortgage? my income is down substantially we did not do any of these loans. we did fixed loans. we cannot do any more right now because the government came around and change the rules. what i do to modify my mortgage? >> i wish i had an answer. your story sounds very similar to hundreds of other of the borrowers. there is a lot of confusion. i do not know really what to offer other than to check out the resources that lender consortium has put together. it is unfortunate that ithere have been a lot of modifications. host: thank you so much for being here. that is your money segment where we look at how taxpayer dollars are spent. we were look more on that on future mondays. we will be back at 7:00 tomorrow. we now go to the american enterprise institute which is holding a panel on a for-profit and federal education. [captioning performed by na
and its aftermath. it has been a very challenging time for new york city. i think you have shown quite a bit of fortitude in coming back and getting back to business. my remarks today are going to focus on the reasons for the disappointingly slow pace of economic recovery in the united states, and the policy actions that have been taken by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three
, is right at the center of this storm. so that's the city of sacramento. perhaps 100,000 or more people in serious gemdy. should a levee break and those levees are not up to 200-year standards, should a levee break in that region, people would have less than 20 minutes to find high ground to get out. an impossible situation. so we need serious infrastructure impro. and that's sacramento. the rest of my new district goes further north into marysville and yuba city, along the sacramento river, further north, and along the yuba river. again, communities at high risk. serious infrastructure need to be developed. levees need to be improved. upgrade -- upgraded, enhanced. otherwise citizens are at risk just like they were in staten island. this is our responsibility. this is not only a local responsibility and a state responsibility, this is a national responsibility. this is where we become a national community. looking out for each other. providing the basic infrastructure to protect us. we also have infrastructure that's necessary for commerce. our roads, our highways, our internet systems
those centered in the city. 8000 people in a 27-day campaign in the month of february 1982. they felt if they backed off they would be severely punished. after 1982, the next 10 following years, government punished the syrians collectively. there were about 18,000 forcibly disappeared people whose files are still not closed. thousands and thousands of prisoners. the syrians felt they had to continue at any cost. when international help does not come, the idea of the fed started forming -- defense started forming itself. those soldiers started forming small groups to defend what they called the peacefulness of the revolution. they started calling around buildings, because that is where snipers used to shoot a peaceful protesters. what happened is in order to achieve the defense of civilians, the small groups that increasingly became joined by civilians that -- that took of civilians, families and suburbs started engaging in a more pro- actively approach. however, even when they succeeded in liberated their areas, they could not protect themselves in the air. the regime still held air p
into the fall. the question is on if america will rise up and rushed to this city and announced that enough is enough. although the voices of the minority should be heard, they have a right under this flag that they will not control this nation in the most distasteful way that they have done to undermine those that cannot speak for themselves. that is what we are facing today and some have some very tough decisions to make. >> we have to go vote, so maybe we can catch up a little bit later. we have not put the caucus to a person, but we have most of them very dissatisfied and many are going to be voting no. >> are you prepared to have partial responsibility? you are willing to accept that? >> the answer is a definitive no. the reason is because all of us voted for a clean debt ceiling, and 18 times, reagan got a clean vote. this is the normal course of congress, we are all prepared to do it now. what drove us to this point? it is beyond dispute, the decoupling of the debt ceiling in debt reduction has gotten us to this place. we have been fighting for the economy. we have one more and then
of spending on public education in d.c. and any major city and say, as we've spent more dollars per capita, have we gotten more education. >> your short answer is you don't. >> no. and this is where the modern republican party is light years ahead of the 1994 gingrich revolution where guys said, get rid of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you.
clout. and political sway of some of the eu's institutions. finally, all while parts of new york city are still recovering from hurricane sandy, tradition is being maintained as the macy's thanksgiving day parade stops off in manhattan. and for many large retailers from the traditional black friday is a starting later today. some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you career officers, you disch -- changed this army. go and find your soldiers. do not find them in the villages and towns of america. and we did that. and over about five or six years recruited an absolutely splendid force of young men and women more willing to serve their country as volunteers, and they had the same tradition, the same culture, the same loyalty and dedication as any other generation of americans. and they proved themselves in the gulf war, the panama invasion. it proved themselves in the past 10 years and iraq and afghanistan. but the theme we have to keep in mind is something that president lincoln said. to care for those who are born to battle. to care. that means never forget that they are carr
of the world. a city built on a hill cannot be head. -- hid. no one after lighting a lamp puts it under a bushel basket, but on a lab stand, and it gives light to all in the house. -- lamp stand, and it gives light to all in the house. the gospel of the lord. in the name of god, amen. >> please be seated. in little prince laid down and wept. 500 roses in a garden. on the planet he ruled, he had a single rose who had told him that she was unique. and yet here were 500 roses, just like her in one garden. i thought i was rich, he thought sadly, with a flower unique in all the universe. then the little prince met a fox who taught him an important lesson about love. to me, the fox said, you are nothing more than a little boy who is just like a thousand other boys. i have no need of you, and you have no need of me. but if you tammy, then we shall need each other. to me, -- tame me, then we shall need each other. to me, you will be unique in all the world. the prince realized that for the roses, he felt nothing. but he loved his rose, far away on his tiny planet, the rose he watered and shelte
. i got my draft notice income across ago looking marine purity city could go to quantico and they will get you in good shape. i had to do both boot camps and one summer. -- in one summer. i then went back and graduated in joined the marine corps. it was the most defining experience of my life. i have all intention of staying in three years and getting out. as i got involved with the people in the leadership and the mission of the marine corps and what we're doing for the country and just the experience itself, i decided to stay. it was a great opportunity for me to serve the country. what i learned from that experience is everyone that you meet in the military and the country has something to offer. everyone has something to offer. everyone is capable of doing something. you are more capable of doing more than what you expect to can do. i always say that we always raise the bar higher. that was some of the experiences. people are extraordinary. the young marines were exceptional all through my career. >> your younger days were a bit different. i read that you grep up in i
going over the fiscal clef. host: david from union city. good morning. are you with us? ok. dave is turning into the tv rather than the phone call. we will look at the peace study. -- pew study. let's go to marie in alabama, a a democrat. good morning. caller: good morning. can you hear me? i think that the states are already represented through their congresspersons. we do not need to have double representation. host: ok. let's go to springfield, georgia on the independent line. caller: good morning. my comment is there are a number of states that are not paying enough to the federal government. they get a lot more money back. to have these states have more input into the crisis, i think it would be a major mistake. the election has been decided already. obama 1. his referendum should be, it just that, what ever he wants. the states are complaining. they're not paying enough to the federal government. you have a lot of other states that are more liberal that are supporting people. host: agusta, georgia. caller: actually, the people have spoken. they have spoken because they reel
who said that the damage was unprecedented. that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced. governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. we had a fires. we had hurricane-force winds. we had massive of flooding. we had feet of snow. you look at that, the flooding of the subway systems, the shutdown of the stock exchange, you start to get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. and yet, the networks performed. carry dozens of stories about how many consumers only wink to information was through their smartphones. linking social media and their smartphone. while there was obviously an impact, i think the networks performed really well. >> some networks did well, some networks did less well. we do not have a solid information about this because there are no reporting requirements. there are no standards by which we measure performance. it is entirely voluntary as to whether they want to talk to their state and local governments are not. i take their word for its that debate responded well. i also anecdotally heard that some of these guys may be
destructively partisan and and it is encouraging to me that it is bipartisan. at a time when our city has become ideologically rigid. it is clear if you look at our history that we only make progress when the compromise. we are such a big, diverse country, with some many different opinions. this is a bipartisan compromise. it is the beginning of a long, hard march back to fiscal responsibility. back to a balanced budget. what troubles me about it is that the bipartisan compromise represents a bipartisan agreement by each party to yield to the other party's most politically and ideologically sense of priorities. for democrats, it is to protect and had been spending. four republicans, it is to not raise taxes. the reality is we have got to do some of " if we are going to get our country back into balance. because this agreement does not really touch the entitlement programs, but tickly medicare, which is growing faster, bigger than any other government program, it puts all of the burden of getting back toward balance in our budget, on the so-called confectioneries spending on our budget, that is a
city, which got ravaged by 9/11. a plane had crashed right in their village. now the storm. steve was pursuing nancy pelosi because we did a story trying to find out how come members of congress can invest in wall street and not in stock, that is related to businesses they are looking at on capitol hill, without having to abide by the rules you and i do in terms of insider trading. that law got changed. the change happened right after. that was just this year. it is a really good question. it is part of what motivates people in the news business. you can have an impact. you feel a lot better about what you are doing when you are working on something important. i can tell you all so i worked in a lot of places in local news in my six years before i got to cbs news and i learned from places i did not agree with their philosophy. there is so much to learn. you find out what you do not want to be part of. "news, we do not want to go out there to make e news. we want to scare people." it is my favorite line. [laughter] i learned so much on that job and other jobs on stations with diffe
and the postal service and city governments and everybody else down the line and our military. that is not american at all. host: are you a retired postal caller: worker yes, i am. i retired in 2004. host: what kind of pension or retire benham -- retirement benefits you have? caller: they offset my benefits for social security. they take out for my insurance that i have. health insurance, blue cross/blue shield and end up with $300 per month the. is pretty outrageous, isn't it, considering they counted me as having 23 years in there. i was a postmaster when i became legally blind. that is beside the point. you don't get rich off the retirement unless you have been there for a lot of years. host: so after 23 years, what do you get in social security? do they take out for that? caller: s, when you first retire, they are mandated by law -- mr. reagan and his troops, when they read it so security in 1983-1986, they came up with federal employees retirement system. they were wanting to eliminate several services altogether. that was because of the benefits. if you have $1,000 so se
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